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culturico_editorial

Greta Thunberg is turning revolutionary – and why this isn’t any good

After her first sensationalist speech at the COP24 in Katowice in 2018, Greta Thunberg has given another impressive speech at the General Assembly of the United Nations in New York. Although her speech is almost identical to her previous one, on this occasion she raised a stark voice of dissent and berated politicians. This move intends to place her as the paladin of a “green” revolution with the purpose of completely replacing the existing political class to drive policy change. Here we discuss the limitations – and the dangers – of this approach.

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Recent articles

Essay

Poetry must seek the other

This short essay reflects upon the political and social relationship between poetry and modernity. It picks two moments to articulate a wider trend in what is a more complex story: one, the coming of capitalist modernity in America and Europe, finding contrary voices in the poetry of Walt Whitman and Charles Baudelaire, and two, the contemporary crisis of our modernity, exemplified in the voices of poets like Paavo Haavikko, Najwan Darwish and Ilya Kaminsky.

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Lebanon

The protests in Lebanon: a united vibrant civil society emerges in the face of corruption and divisive sectarianism

The past two weeks have been anything but calm in Lebanon. More than a million people spontaneously took to the streets across the country and in the rest of the world to protest against corruption. Anger has united Lebanese of all social, economic and confessional backgrounds against the corrupt political class. This unprecedented revolution finally broke the sectarian barriers that have long separated people, and ignited a spark of hope for the country’s future.

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Environment

Greta Thunberg is turning revolutionary – and why this isn’t any good

After her first sensationalist speech at the COP24 in Katowice in 2018, Greta Thunberg has given another impressive speech at the General Assembly of the United Nations in New York. Although her speech is almost identical to her previous one, on this occasion she raised a stark voice of dissent and berated politicians. This move intends to place her as the paladin of a “green” revolution with the purpose of completely replacing the existing political class to drive policy change. Here we discuss the limitations – and the dangers – of this approach.

Read More »
International Relations

Terrorists against terrorists: a sad Kurdish tale

Kurdish forces defeated ISIL in Syria with the support of the United States. The recent departure of the Americans has left the Kurds alone to face their destiny. Within the last few days Turkey has launched an offensive against Kurdish forces, considering them to be a terror group. Is Turkey taking advantage of a broad and imprecise definition of “terrorism” to justify its aggressive behaviors? Can Kurds be defined as terrorists considering that they gave their lives in the fight against ISIL?

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Essay

Critical thinking in education

The access to information and the spread of ideas brought about by technological advancement represents a huge leap forward for humanity. However, with an increasing volume of communication present in everyday life there is a greater need to critically examine this overwhelming amount of information. Many of us are not educated in a way that allows such a critical appraisal of so many subjects. In this article I discuss the implications of a lack of critical thinking skills and why this should be an essential component of everyone’s education.

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International Relations

Libya: migrants are paying the price of a French geopolitical game

On the 2nd of July 2019, the Tajoura detention camp for migrants outside of Tripoli was hit by a French missile, in a strike conducted by forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar. Although France has denied breaching the UN arms embargo, it has several reasons to provide military support to Haftar. This move could help Paris to gain leadership momentum in Europe while maintaining its strong economic interests in Africa.

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Macrostory

Giving birth: a woman’s choice between nature and medicine

The number of women giving birth without methods of pain-relief are low. Women are experiencing great fears about the pain of giving birth, making them want to exploit all medical pain relieving possibilities. A lack of trust in the body’s natural pain relieving mechanisms and an excessive supply of medical interventions is putting women in the dilemma of having to choose between modern medicine and nature.

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Essay

Is Netflix series “How to sell drugs online (fast)” an incitement to narcotics abuse?

At first sight, Netflix series “How to sell drugs online (fast)” seems to foster the consumption of narcotics and their illegal business among teenagers. In this article we try to go deeper beneath the surface: are media discourses only focused on condemning drug abuse still effective? Have they ever been? What if communication based on permission and legitimacy of drug experience turned out to be more effective? Netflix might have opened a new wave of reasoning we should at least discuss.

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In case you missed it

Indoor smoking: a sad Austrian story

Indoor smoking: a sad Austrian story

In 2017, the newly elected Austrian government decided to reverse a previously passed law to completely ban indoor smoking in bars and restaurants. The Austrian public reacted with big protests and petitions – all without success. The motives of the Austrian politicians are very questionable and raise serious questions about their sense of responsibility towards citizens.

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Antifragility and response asymmetry

Antifragility and response asymmetry

This article serves as an introduction to a fundamental concept in the philosophy of risk taking: antifragility, which itself can be seen as a special case of response asymmetry. These concepts deal with the question of how to act intelligently in environments that are characterized by low probability, high impact events (so-called Black Swans).

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Anna Stelling-Germani cancer research

Finding the right treatment: the many cures for cancer

Many people believe that there will be a single drug or treatment found by scientists that will cure all kinds of cancer. This is, unfortunately, a quite widespread misconception regarding cancer research. Due to the complexity of the disease, the future of cancer treatment lies in a more targeted and personalised approach. Combined knowledge about the biology of cancer and combined effort from physicians and scientists will be needed to find the best way to treat cancer in the future.

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My host parents, the secret to my successful integration in Germany

My host parents, the secret to my successful integration in Germany

The greatest difficulty of moving abroad for education was being away from my family. However, having a host family that provided hospitality, understanding, and interest facilitated in bridging the gaps between my culture and the German one, and to ease my integration into the community. Successful stories of integration extend further to include thousands of asylum applicants who seek refuge in Germany. The experiences to be learned from my story can also be applied for asylum seekers.

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Robot sex brothels: good or bad?

Two years ago, the first sex doll-based brothel was opened in Spain. At the current time, is the growing fame and success of these brothels something to worry about? Are robot sex workers great tools to replace prostitution, or will they be the cause of further societal damage?

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