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culturico_editorial

Will a general election solve the UK’s Brexit problem?

Recently a motion was passed in the UK parliament to allow a general election to take place on the 12th December 2019. The main reason for this is the long-standing failure of the House of Commons to agree on the UK withdrawal from the European Union. Ministers believe that a general election will allow people to break the deadlock in parliament, with the formation of a majority government that is able to pass legislation without strong opposition. In this article I discuss why a general election is unlikely to solve the UK’s Brexit problem.

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Recent articles

Macrostory

How is Saint Barbara associated with a delicious dish?

St. Barbara’s fest is celebrated by Arab Christians (Greek Orthodox, Roman Catholics, and Protestant) in December every year. This day is very special in the Levant, not only for Christians, but also for many fans of ‘Burbara’. This wheat festive dish is celebrated by Christian family members of all ages and enjoyed best when shared with Muslim neighbors and friends.

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Macrostory

Will a general election solve the UK’s Brexit problem?

Recently a motion was passed in the UK parliament to allow a general election to take place on the 12th December 2019. The main reason for this is the long-standing failure of the House of Commons to agree on the UK withdrawal from the European Union. Ministers believe that a general election will allow people to break the deadlock in parliament, with the formation of a majority government that is able to pass legislation without strong opposition. In this article I discuss why a general election is unlikely to solve the UK’s Brexit problem.

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Macrostory

Does the unhappiness of scientists influence the quality of research?

Mental health issues are on the rise within academia. The working conditions resulting from publishing pressure are leading to stress and bad work-life balance. Many young academics are unhappy and want to leave science as soon as they finish their PhD. These factors likely result in an overall decrease in the quality of research, which has to be halted in order to maintain a good progression of knowledge.

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Essay

Fabrizio De André – a new ethical left?

The political left is in disarray across Italy, Europe, and most of the world. Into the vacuum created by the death of communism have poured centrist ‘Third way’ parties and social justice movements. However noble their cause, the disenfranchised working classes increasingly abandon them for new right-wing nationalist parties, who offer them nothing but scapegoats. Here, I propose that the continued popularity of Italian singer-songwriter Fabrizio De André hints at a path forward for a future political thought: one that combines social and economic justice, and most crucially, one that searches with all its heart for an overarching philosophy to

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Biology

Reverse Vaccinology: from a dream to reality

Vaccines have eradicated some of the deadliest infectious diseases known to man, yet scientists have been challenged by the inability to create vaccines for all pathogens in the past. Recently, scientists have focused on the DNA of microbes to help develop vaccines by using a technique called “Reverse Vaccinology”. This efficient and cost-effective approach is expected to revolutionize vaccine development in the 21st century and is also being used as a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and antibiotic resistance.

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Essay

Poetry must seek the other

This short essay reflects upon the political and social relationship between poetry and modernity. It picks two moments to articulate a wider trend in what is a more complex story: one, the coming of capitalist modernity in America and Europe, finding contrary voices in the poetry of Walt Whitman and Charles Baudelaire, and two, the contemporary crisis of our modernity, exemplified in the voices of poets like Paavo Haavikko, Najwan Darwish and Ilya Kaminsky.

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Lebanon

The protests in Lebanon: a united vibrant civil society emerges in the face of corruption and divisive sectarianism

The past two weeks have been anything but calm in Lebanon. More than a million people spontaneously took to the streets across the country and in the rest of the world to protest against corruption. Anger has united Lebanese of all social, economic and confessional backgrounds against the corrupt political class. This unprecedented revolution finally broke the sectarian barriers that have long separated people, and ignited a spark of hope for the country’s future.

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Environment

Greta Thunberg is turning revolutionary – and why this isn’t any good

After her first sensationalist speech at the COP24 in Katowice in 2018, Greta Thunberg has given another impressive speech at the General Assembly of the United Nations in New York. Although her speech is almost identical to her previous one, on this occasion she raised a stark voice of dissent and berated politicians. This move intends to place her as the paladin of a “green” revolution with the purpose of completely replacing the existing political class to drive policy change. Here we discuss the limitations – and the dangers – of this approach.

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International Relations

Terrorists against terrorists: a sad Kurdish tale

Kurdish forces defeated ISIL in Syria with the support of the United States. The recent departure of the Americans has left the Kurds alone to face their destiny. Within the last few days Turkey has launched an offensive against Kurdish forces, considering them to be a terror group. Is Turkey taking advantage of a broad and imprecise definition of “terrorism” to justify its aggressive behaviors? Can Kurds be defined as terrorists considering that they gave their lives in the fight against ISIL?

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In case you missed it

Lost empathy: what to change to change the world

Lost empathy: what to change to change the world

Empathy drives us towards actions that relieve the suffering of other people. However, in a world full of information, empathy acts as a negative selective force that pushes us either towards irrelevant or complete inaction. If we wish to change our world, we should highlight information and feel apathetic towards everything else.

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The health of Ha Long Bay

The health of Ha Long Bay

“The Health of Ha Long Bay” addresses personal concerns of negative environmental, ecological and cultural impacts on Ha Long Bay and the Cat Ba Archipelago, Vietnam as a result of boosted tourism in the area due to its declaration as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

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Millennials need to be heard by the Italian film industry

Millennials need to be heard by the Italian film industry

Italy has had a long and very strong history in film dubbing which has yielded some of the best dubbers in the world. This, unfortunately, has led the Italian film industry to indirectly deprive Italians of the possibility to learn another language: it is becoming increasingly difficult for the younger generation to master foreign languages, which would drastically improve their future.

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Living with the fear of losing our insurance: the struggles for our daughter in the US

My daughter was born a second-class citizen. Born, with a rare genetic disease, during the run up to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) she entered the world with a preexisting condition. Even with the law, her life hangs in the balance subject to the whims of our insurer. The United States remains the lone developed nation without universal healthcare. Our government is failing us – it is failing her.

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